Journal cover Journal topic
Primate Biology An international open-access journal on primate research
Primate Biol., 4, 61-67, 2017
http://www.primate-biol.net/4/61/2017/
doi:10.5194/pb-4-61-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Short communication
14 Mar 2017
Report on the presence of a group of golden-headed lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), an endangered primate species in a rubber plantation in southern Bahia, Brazil
Kristel M. De Vleeschouwer1,4 and Leonardo C. Oliveira2,3,4 1Centre for Research and Conservation, Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp, 2018 Antwerp, Belgium
2Departamento de Ciências, Faculdade de Formação de Professores, UERJ, CEP 24435-005, São Gonçalo, RJ, Brazil
3Programa de pós-graduação em Ecologia e Conservação da Biodiversidade, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, UESC, Salobrinho, CEP 45662-900, Ilhéus, BA, Brazil
4Bicho do Mato Instituto de Pesquisa, CEP 30360-082, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
Abstract. In a landscape fragmented by agriculture, the extent to which forest-dwelling primates can use the matrix between fragments can be critical for their long-term survival. So far, the golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), an endangered primate inhabiting the Atlantic Forest of south Bahia, is only known to use shaded cacao (Theobroma cacao) agroforests within the matrix. We report on the use of a rubber plantation by a group of golden-headed lion tamarins between August 2013 and January 2014. The group used the rubber plantation on 16 of the 22 observation days (73 %), and we recorded behaviours such as eating, grooming and sleeping, consistent with the use of the area as a home range. We also observed associations with Wied's marmosets (Callithrix kuhlii). The locations of group sightings were not uniformly spread across the entire area of the rubber plantation, suggesting preferred use of certain areas. The presence of resources such as jackfruits (Artocarpus heterophyllus) and epiphytic bromeliads may be attracting both species to these plantations. In addition to shaded cacao plantations, rubber plantations with the appropriate structure may be a viable option for increasing forest connectivity for both species in south Bahia, reconciling economic rubber production with primate conservation.

Citation: De Vleeschouwer, K. M. and Oliveira, L. C.: Report on the presence of a group of golden-headed lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), an endangered primate species in a rubber plantation in southern Bahia, Brazil, Primate Biol., 4, 61-67, doi:10.5194/pb-4-61-2017, 2017.
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Forest-living primates are particularly vulnerable to the effects of forest fragmentation. The extent to which they can use the agricultural matrix between fragments can be critical for their long-term survival. This paper provides the first record of the use of a rubber plantation by golden-headed lion tamarins, endangered primates inhabiting the Atlantic Forest of south Bahia, Brazil. The results provide opportunities for reconciling economic rubber production with primate conservation.
Forest-living primates are particularly vulnerable to the effects of forest fragmentation. The...
Share