Journal cover Journal topic
Primate Biology An international open-access journal on primate research
Primate Biol., 3, 9-22, 2016
http://www.primate-biol.net/3/9/2016/
doi:10.5194/pb-3-9-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Review article
12 Feb 2016
The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus): a relevant preclinical model of human (auto)immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the brain
Bert A. 't Hart, Jordon Dunham, S. Anwar Jagessar, and Yolanda S. Kap Department Immunobiology, Biomedical Primate Research Centre, Rijswijk, the Netherlands
Abstract. The increasing prevalence of chronic autoimmune-mediated inflammatory disorders (AIMIDs) in aging human populations creates a high unmet need for safe and effective medications. However, thus far the translation of pathogenic concepts developed in animal models into effective treatments for the patient has been notoriously difficult. The main reason is that currently used mouse-based animal models for the pipeline selection of promising new treatments were insufficiently predictive for clinical success. Regarding the high immunological similarity between human and non-human primates (NHPs), AIMID models in NHPs can help to bridge the translational gap between rodent and man. Here we will review the preclinical relevance of the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a small-bodied neotropical primate. EAE is a generic AIMID model projected on the human autoimmune neuro-inflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS).

Citation: 't Hart, B. A., Dunham, J., Jagessar, S. A., and Kap, Y. S.: The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus): a relevant preclinical model of human (auto)immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the brain, Primate Biol., 3, 9-22, doi:10.5194/pb-3-9-2016, 2016.
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Short summary
The increasing prevalence of chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorders (AIMIDs) in aging human populations creates a high unmet need for safe and effective medications. However, thus far the translation of pathogenic concepts developed in animal models into effective treatments for the patient has been notoriously difficult. The main reason is that currently used mouse-based animal models for the pipeline selection of promising new treatments were insufficiently predictive for clinical success.
The increasing prevalence of chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorders (AIMIDs) in aging human...
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